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  • Ms. Jackie

More book recommendations about caring and kindness from DGT

Clifford’s Good Deeds by Norman Bridwell (Cartwell Books, 2010). Ages 4-8.  While he has good intentions, Clifford’s good deeds always seem to result in wacky situations.

Day It Rained Hearts by Felicia Bond (HarperCollins, 2006). Ages 4-8.  When Cornelia Augusta catches hearts from the sky, she must decide what heart to give to what friend.

Each Kindness by Jacqueline Woodson , illustrated by E.B. Lewis (Nancy Paulson Books, 2012). Ages 5-8. When Chloe and her friends reject new girl Maya, she learns a valuable lesson about accepting people.

Buddha at Bedtime: Tales of Love and Wisdom for you to Read withYour Child to Enchant, Enlighten and Inspire by Dharmachari Nagaraja (Duncan Baird, 2008) is a treasure. This book contains 20 modernized versions of ancient Buddhist stories. Most are full of whimsy and wonder, spurring on creative play, even as they teach about kindness, courage, and peace. Each story ends with a short restatement of the moral for reinforcement.

The Berenstain Bears Lend a Helping Hand by Stan and Jan Berenstain (Random House Books for Young Readers, 1998). Ages 4-8. Brother and Sister learn about the rewards of kindness when they help the elderly Widow McGrizz.

Chicken Soup for Little Souls: The Goodness Gorillas by Lisa McCourt (Health Communications, Inc., 1997). This feel-good story teaches the importance of reaching out to others – even the class bully.

If Everybody Did by Jo Ann Stover. (JourneyForth, 1989).  Ages 2 and up. This funny book has a nice message about the impact of your actions on others.

Kids’ Random Acts of Kindness by Dawna Markova (Conari Press, 1994). Ages 3 and up. Stories of loving kindness written by kids of all ages.

Ordinary Mary’s Extraordinary Deed by Emily Pearson (Gibbs Smith, 2002). Ages 4-8. This book offers a lyrical and beautifully illustrated way to introduce and reinforce the “pay it forward” concept of kindness.

Somebody Loves You, Mr. Hatch by Eileen Spinelli, illustrated by Paul Yalowitz (Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 1996). Ages 3-7. A grumpy, lonely man discovers the importance of friendship when he receives an unexpected package from an admirer. A compelling message about the power of kindness

The Gift of Nothing by Patrick McDonnell. (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers, 2009). Ages 5 and up. A wonderful story for inspiring a discussion about the power of friendship, appreciation for what we have, and the true meaning of gift giving.

The Giving Tree by Shel Silverstein (HarperCollins, 2014). Ages 1-8. The simple, classic story of a tree that will do whatever it takes to make a boy happy.

The Quiltmaker’s Gift by Jeff Brumbeau, illustrated by Gail de Marcken (Scholastic Press, 2001). Ages 4-8. A great read and the perfect antidote to the season’s all-too-common messages of materialism and greed.

The Three Questions by Jon J. Muth (Scholastic Press, 2002). Ages 4-8. Based on a short story by Leo Tolstoy, The Three Questions is the story of a little boy’s quest to discover the secret to being a good person.

Zen Shorts by Jon J. Muth (Scholastic Press, 2008). Ages 4-8. Muth weaves three zen fables into a whimsical story of three siblings who befriend their new panda bear neighbor. Each fable provides openings for discussions about anger and forgiveness, wealth, manners, imagination, patience, luck, and many other big ideas.

Kindness Is Cooler, Mrs. Ruler by Margery Cuyler, illustrated by Sachiko Yoshikawa (Simon & Shuster Books for Young Readers, 2007). Ages 5-10.  When Mrs. Ruler’s class is challenged to perform as many good deeds as possible, they find creative and fun ways to give back to people.

Kindness Kingdom board game by Marvelously Well-Mannered, LLC. Ages 5 and up. The importance of manners and empathy is highlighted in this board game.

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